PhD Student Research Topics


Luminescence characterization of ancient materials

Laura GUIDORZI
PhD student in Chemical and Materials Sciences
XXXIII cycle (2018-2020)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Lo Giudice


Abstract: the research project is related to the physico-chemical characterization of materials of historical and artistic interest, with a focus on radiation-emission techniques such as thermoluminescence dating for ceramics and ion beam analysis in the study of lapis lazuli. One of the major aims is to deepen the role of activators and quenchers in the characteristic luminescence of diopside - one of the principal mineralogical phases in the blue rock - by means of multivariate analysis.


Study of Eritrean ancient amphorae

Abraham ZERAI GEBREMARIAM
PhD student in Technologies for Cultural Heritage
XXXIV cycle (2019-2021)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Lo Giudice


Abstract: archaeological excavations in the ancient port city of Adulis (in present day Eritrea) since the turn of the last century yielded a large corpus of what most specialists would call Ayla/Aquaba - Aksum amphorae. The research is expected to understand the provenance of these samples from mineralogical and chemical perspectives via a comparative parallels with existing archaeometric datasets from the sites of Aquaba (in Jordan) and Zafar (in Yemen).


Study of ancient ceramic materials from Mongolia

Tengis SARAN
PhD student in Technologies for Cultural Heritage
XXXV cycle (2020-2022)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Nicola Amapane


Abstract: the aim of this project is to apply luminescence dating to the grey- and red-colored bricks collected from Karakorum (Mongolia) and to apply archaeometric methods to the bricks of different technology or provenance.


Study of ground stone Palaeolithic tools

Giusi SORRENTINO
PhD student in Technologies for Cultural Heritage
XXXV cycle (2020-2022)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Lo Giudice


Abstract: this research sets up an investigative protocol that guides archaeologists, scientists and museum professionals to recognise, study, interpret, and properly preserve ground stone tools (GST) from Early Upper Palaeolithic sites. The goal is to develop a multi-scale advanced heuristic, for the comprehension of GST function and the processes in which they were involved, in order to REVEAL artefacts' complex biography.


X-Ray fluorescence mapping and digital radiography

Leandro SOTTILI
PhD student in Technologies for Cultural Heritage
XXXV cycle (2020-2022)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Re


Abstract: the aim of the project is to develop a multiple techniques apparatus for Cultural Heritage studies, such as archaeological finds and paintings, in Turin. The instrument will be an upgrade of the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanner developed by the INFN-CHNet collaboration the network of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) devoted to Cultural Heritage.


Digital x-ray imaging (radiography and tomography)

Luisa VIGORELLI
PhD student in Metrology at Politecnico of Torino
XXXV cycle (2020-2022)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Re


Abstract: applied metrology in the Cultural Heritage field; characterization and implementation of a new instrument based on an innovative x-ray source and a flat panel detector for digital imaging measurements (radiography and tomography).

Graduated PhD Student Research Topics


Study of Celtic and Ancient Roman coins

Jacopo CORSI
PhD in Chemical and Materials Sciences
XXVII cycle (2012-2014)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Lo Giudice


Abstract: this research project aims to bring new light on two different silver coinages circulating between 4th and 1st century B.C. in the Cisalpine Gaul, ancient name of northern Italy: the drachma, minted by Celtics and native populations, and the Roman victoriatus.


Mineral-petrographic characterisation of lapis lazuli

Debora ANGELICI
PhD in Earth Science
XXVI cycle (2011-2014)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Borghi


Abstract: the work firstly aimed at performing a systematic characterisation of rock samples of known provenance, in order to create a database with the identified minero-chemical markers useful to discriminate different quarry districts. The second aim was the application of the protocol tested with the rock samples, analysing precious artefacts in non-invasive way to obtain information about the provenance of the raw material used for their realisation.


Iob beam analysis on lapis lazuli

Alessandro RE
PhD in Physics
XXIII cycle (2008-2010)

Academic supervisor: Prof. Alessandro Lo Giudice


Abstract: ion beam analysis are widely used to characterize materials of archaeological, historical and artistic interest because they do not require any sample preparation, they can be performed in air and they do not damage the sample at low ion fluences. An interesting material to be analyzed by means of Ion Beam Analysis is lapis lazuli.